Tuesday, August 15, 2017

State Lookup, Reduction in SNAP Benefits Because of Reported Reductions in SNAP Households W Excess Shelter Deductions.

In my post earlier this week HERE, I presented updated 2015 national data to show the $1.1 billion reduction in SNAP benefits that occurred because of reductions in the frequency in use of the excess shelter deduction from 2014.  

A primary reason for that reduction was that the share of SNAP beneficiaries who used the excess shelter deduction dropped from 72% in 2014 to 67.5% in 2015, a drop of 1.109 million households.   


The Excel workbook HERE and embedded below allows a lookup by state to see changes in SNAP benefits resulting from that reduction in excess shelter deductions.  (To use the pull down to select a state you MAY have to download the Excel file).


A BIG reason for the national reduction appears to be California, which saw 

  • A reported drop of 387,000 SNAP households with the excess shelter deduction.
  • A reported 23.9% drop in the % of all SNAP households w the excess shelter deduction: From 92.9% in 2014 to 70.7% in 2015. 
  • A nearly $581 million drop in SNAP benefits because of the reduction in the number of households with the excess shelter deduction.
I also note that from 2014-2015 Michigan, New Jersey, and Wisconsin also saw 20% + drops in the % of all SNAP households with the excess shelter deduction. (Oregon had a much more modest drop of 3.2% in the share of SNAP households with the excess shelter deduction). 



Originally created and posted on the Oregon Housing Blog

Monday, August 14, 2017

My estimate: SNAP households lost $1.5 Billion in SNAP Benefits Because of Reductions in Excess Shelter Deductions from 2014-2015.

Last year HERE I estimated that SNAP households in 2014 received a total $22.9 BILLION in additional SNAP benefits because the deduction of excess housing expenses [more than 50% of income] from income allowed higher SNAP benefits.  

The table below updates that data to 2015:



In 2015 the number of SNAP households with excess housing deductions decreased from 16.1 million to 15.06 million, a decrease of 1.1 million households. 

NOTE: The total number of SNAP households decreased by only 152,000 households from 2014-2015 ( from 22.445 million in 2014 to to 22.293 million in 2015 ; this is substantially LESS than the 1.1 million reduction in SNAP households with excess housing expense deductions. In 2014 the % of SNAP households with the excess shelter deduction was 72%, that dropped to 67.5% in 2015.

The average SNAP excess shelter expense deduction in 2015 increased very slightly from $393-$394 per month. 

Using the same prior assumption that 30% of the excess housing deduction = additional SNAP benefits this would mean that the net increase in SNAP benefits because of the excess shelter deduction declined from $22.9 BILLION in 2014 to $21.3 BILLION in 2015, a reduction of 7% /$1.5 BILLION.

Even with the reduction the net increase in SNAP benefits from the excess shelter deduction was $19.1 BILLION higher in 2015 vs 2000.

Originally created and posted on the Oregon Housing Blog



Tuesday, August 8, 2017

All Portland Redlined Neighborhood Narratives from HOLC 1938 MAPS.

I have combined into one PDF document HERE all of the narratives for the 9 Portland redlined neighborhoods found in the 1938 HOLC maps.  

IF you want to directly zoom into the boundaries for each area on a map you can substitute the map area designation in the string below, substituting D2, D3, etc for D1below. 

https://dsl.richmond.edu/panorama/redlining/#loc=12/45.5175/-122.6816&opacity=1&area=D1&city=portland-or

Thanks again to Mapping Inequality for doing the map work and for providing me with the narratives for Portland. 

Originally created and posted on the Oregon Housing Blog

HOLC Redlining Map and Area Description for Inner NE Portland Neighborhood.

Thanks to the folks at Mapping Inequality, in Richmond VA. I have the area descriptions for those 9 Portland areas that were redlined in the 1937 maps of the Home Owners' Loan Corporation. While I have seen the maps before, I haven't seen the actual narrative descriptions until now. 

The first area description is for area labelled D 2, which is in inner NE Portland and included, according to HOLC, three quarter of Portland's black residents. 

The map for that area is HERE and pasted below:


The area description , as a PDF file, is HERE.  (I found it best to download and print the one pager rather than zooming in and out on the screen). 

It includes this detailed description. 

Originally created and posted on the Oregon Housing Blog.


Monday, August 7, 2017

PDX Rent CPI UP 8.4% in 12 months and PDX HUD 2 BR FMR Has Kept Pace Since 2007. PDX CPI Cumulative Rent Increase Since 2007 is 68% HIGHER than US.

The Portland-Salem CPI for the first half of 2017 is up 4.4% from the first half of 2016.  
The RENT component of CPI however is up 8.4% for that same period.  

Since the first half of 2007, the RENT component of the Portland-Salem CPI is up by 52.4%

Interestingly the HUD 2 BR FMR for Portland is up by an even higher 68.5% from 2007-2017 aided by a substantial jump of 21.1% in 2017. 

All of this is shown in the table pasted below:



ALSO....
The table below compares the cumulative % increases in rent of primary residence for both Portland and the US from the 1st half of 2007 to the 1st half of 2017.  The cumulative 52.4 % increase for Portland Salem is 68% HIGHER than the US increase of 31%. 



Originally created and posted on the Oregon Housing Blog